The Tortoise and the Soldier (Hardcover)

A Story of Courage and Friendship in World War I

By Michael Foreman, Michael Foreman (Illustrator)

Henry Holt and Co. (BYR), 9781627791731, 128pp.

Publication Date: November 24, 2015

List Price: 16.99*
* Individual store prices may vary.

Description

As a boy, Henry Friston dreamed of traveling the world. He thought he was signing up for a lifetime of adventure when he joined the Royal Navy. But when World War I begins, it launches the world, and Henry, into turmoil. While facing enemy fire at Gallipoli, Henry discovers the strength he needs to survive in an unexpected source: a tortoise. And so begins the friendship of a lifetime. Based on true events, and with charming illustrations, this story of war, courage, and friendship will win the hearts of readers.



About the Author

Michael Foreman is the author and illustrator of many best-selling books for children, including War Boy and War Game. He first met Henry Friston and Ali Pasha as a young boy growing up in England, where he still makes his home today.

Michael Foreman is the author and illustrator of many best-selling books for children, including War Boy and War Game. He first met Henry Friston and Ali Pasha as a young boy growing up in England, where he still makes his home today.


Praise For The Tortoise and the Soldier: A Story of Courage and Friendship in World War I

“This touching story will live on for generations to come.” —Michael Morpurgo, author of War Horse

“Foreman is that rare artist who writes as well as he illustrates. . . . An original middle-grade novella with unusual richness and depth.” —Kirkus Reviews, starred review

"A good choice for independent readers who want war stories but may not be ready for more horrific accounts, this beautifully illustrated book also reads aloud well. . . . A memorable story of war, growing up, and yes, a tortoise." —Booklist, starred review

“The multilayered storytelling, Foreman's dramatic watercolor illustrations, and reproductions of period mementos provide a nuanced portrait of the bonds between Friston and Ali Pasha, as well as between the older man and a curious journalist-in-training.” —Publishers Weekly

"the war account is compelling and Foreman’s art enhances the storytelling." —The Bulletin