Last-But-Not-Least Lola and the Wild Chicken (Paperback)

By Christine Pakkala, Paul Hoppe (Illustrator)

Boyds Mills Press, 9781629794044, 216pp.

Publication Date: October 6, 2015

Other Editions of This Title:
Hardcover (9/1/2014)

List Price: 7.95*
* Individual store prices may vary.

Description

Lola doesn't want to share her on-again, off-again best friend Amanda with Jessie (who seems to be around all the time)—much less with the new girl Savannah. But when the four girls embark on a school field trip to a local farm, a crazy encounter with a wild chicken may be just what's needed to steer them all toward one another. Young readers will find this latest caper starring loveable Lola hilarious and heartfelt.


About the Author

Christine Pakkala has an MFA in Poetry from Iowa Writers' Workshop and has taught seventh- and ninth-grade English in New York City. Last-But-Not-Least Lola and the Wild Chicken is her third novel. She lives in Westport, Connecticut. christinepakkala.com.

Paul Hoppe is an illustrator, designer, and author who teaches at the School of Visual Arts. He is the author-illustrator of two picture books and the illustrator for several other picture books and young adult books. His work has been published by the New York Times and the New Yorker. He lives in Brooklyn, New York. paulhoppe.de.


Praise For Last-But-Not-Least Lola and the Wild Chicken

" . . . Pakkala perfectly captures the competitive jealousy that sparks among little girls as they claim best friends, as well as the supportive tone of a good teacher caring for well-intentioned but accident-causing pupils. Hoppe's smart cartoon spot illustrations suit the fast-paced, emotionally resonant, and sometimes silly story, further qualifying Lola as the up-to-date heir of Beverly Cleary's Ramona stories. Sweet Lola, who never means to but routinely gets in trouble, will be a comforting character for emergent readers, especially those who sometimes have a hard time not making mistakes." —Booklist

" . . . The characters in this contemporary story are delightfully complex, and while they claim to dislike one another, the empathy they display toward one another is what sets this story apart . . . The pen-and-ink drawings are bright and inviting . . . this romp is a worthwhile read." —School Library Journal