Echoes of Gallipoli (Paperback)

In the Words of New Zealand's Mounted Riflemen

By Terry Kinloch

Exisle Publishing, 9781775592624, 320pp.

Publication Date: February 15, 2016

List Price: 29.99*
* Individual store prices may vary.

Description

First published ten years ago to enthusiastic reviews and critical acclaim, this classic celebrated readable scholarship is now available in paperback. Using their letters and diaries, Echoes of Gallipoli tells the story of Gallipoli through the eyes of the men of the New Zealand Mounted Rifles Brigade with the immediacy of actually being there. It is a fresh way of telling history, and one that is sure to find a response among New Zealanders today. The full story is here: the call-up, the sea journey, camp in Egypt, the eventual arrival in Gallipoli, all the battles and skirmishes that were fought there, and finally the remarkable evacuation several months later.



About the Author

Terry Kinloch was a regular officer in the New Zealand Army for thirty years. He completed operational tours in Bosnia-Herzegovina, Bougainville and Egypt, and non-operational postings in Australia, the United Kingdom and the United States of America. He is a graduate of Auckland University, the Royal Military College of Science, the Australian Army Command and Staff College, and the United States Army War College. He became a Member of the New Zealand Order of Merit in 2006. Godley (2018) is Terry’s third work of military history. His first two books, entitled Echoes of Gallipoli: In the Words of New Zealand’s Mounted Riflemen and Devils on Horses: In the Words of the Anzacs in the Middle East 1916–19, were published by Exisle in 2005 and 2007 respectively. The latter book was a finalist in the 2008 Montana New Zealand Book Awards. Terry Kinloch lives in Wellington, New Zealand, with his wife Carol. 



Praise For Echoes of Gallipoli: In the Words of New Zealand's Mounted Riflemen

"Echoes of Gallipoli tells the tortuous journey of the NZ Mounted Rifles (NZMR) Brigade from mobilisation in August 1914 through to their evacuation from the Gallipoli peninsula in December 1915.”
- Australian Defence Magazine