The Next Revolution (Hardcover)

Popular Assemblies and the Promise of Direct Democracy

By Murray Bookchin, Debbie Bookchin (Editor), Blair Taylor (Editor), Ursula K. Le Guin (Preface by)

Verso, 9781781685808, 220pp.

Publication Date: February 24, 2015

Other Editions of This Title:
Paperback (1/6/2015)

List Price: 95.00*
* Individual store prices may vary.

Description

From Athens to New York, recent mass movements around the world have challenged austerity and authoritarianism with expressions of real democracy. For more than forty years, Murray Bookchin developed these democratic aspirations into a new left politics based on popular assemblies, influencing a wide range of political thinkers and social movements.

With a foreword by the best-selling author of The Dispossessed, Ursula K. Le Guin, The Next Revolution brings together Bookchin’s essays on freedom and direct democracy for the first time, offering a bold political vision that can move us from protest to social transformation.


About the Author

Murray Bookchin was an active voice in the ecology and anarchist movements for more than forty years, and is the author of The Ecology of Freedom and Post-Scarcity Anarchism, among many other books.


Praise For The Next Revolution: Popular Assemblies and the Promise of Direct Democracy

“Over the years, Murray Bookchin has dedicated his remarkable talents and energy to many different domains: history, technology, social organization, the search for justice and freedom, and much else. In every case, he has brought illumination and insight, original and provocative ideas, and inspiring vision. His new collection on radical democracy carries forward this lifetime of great achievement.”
—Noam Chomsky

“Murray Bookchin is one of the most original and important radical thinkers and writers of the modern era. He understands the destructive force of corporate capitalism and the revolutionary zeal it will take to extricate ourselves from its grip.”
 —Chris Hedges, author of Wages of Rebellion

“By far the most sophisticated radical proposal to deal with the creation and collective use of the commons across a variety of scales, and is well worth elaborating as part of the radical anticapitalist agenda.”
—David Harvey, author of Rebel Cities

“As an introduction to the thought of Murray Bookchin it is incredibly valuable and serves to motivate deeper engagement with his more detailed works on urbanization, social ecology, and ‘libertarian municipalism.’”
Marx and Philosophy Review of Books