Beyond Black and White (Paperback)

Transforming African-American Politics

By Manning Marable

Verso, 9781844673834, 320pp.

Publication Date: September 7, 2009

Other Editions of This Title:
Hardcover (9/1/2009)

List Price: 24.95*
* Individual store prices may vary.

Description

Many in the US, including Barack Obama, have called for a ‘post-racial’ politics: yet race still divides the country politically, economically and socially.

In this expanded new edition of a highly acclaimed work, Manning Marable rejects both liberal inclusionist strategies and the separatist politics of the likes of Louis Farrakhan, arguing powerfully for a new ‘transformationist’ strategy, which retains a distinctive black cultural identity but draws together all the poor and exploited in a united struggle against oppression. In a substantial new introduction, Marable looks back at the last ten years of African-American politics and the fight against racism, outlining a trenchant analysis of the ‘New Racial Domain’ that must be uprooted.


About the Author

Manning Marable (1950–2011) was M. Moran Weston/Black Alumni Council Professor of African-American Studies, and Professor of Public Affairs, History and Political Science at Columbia University in New York City. Marable wroted, edited or contributed to several books, including How Capitalism Underdeveloped Black America (1983), Black American Politics (1985), Black Leadership (1998), The Great Wells of Democracy (2002), Living Black History (2006), and Malcolm X: A Life of Reinvention (2011).


Praise For Beyond Black and White: Transforming African-American Politics

“Marable argues tirelessly not just for better days for black America, but for Americans in general.”—The Progressive

“This book is important reading for activists and theorists alike, and for all of us who want to be both.”—Angela Y. Davis

“Vital reading for anyone concerned with African-American politics today.”—Jesse Jackson

Beyond Black and White correctly identifies the rapidly changing notions of race that have led to what some call post-racialism.”—Charles Henry, Journal of American History