The First International and After (Hardcover)

By Karl Marx, David Fernbach (Editor), Tariq Ali (Foreword by)

Verso, 9781844676064, 412pp.

Publication Date: August 31, 2010

Other Editions of This Title:
Paperback (8/31/2010)

List Price: 80.00*
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Description

Karl Marx was not only the great theorist of capitalism, he was also a superb journalist, politician and historian. In these brand-new editions of Marx’s Political Writings we are able to see the depth and range of his mature work from 1848 through to the end of his life, from The Communist Manifesto to The Class Struggles in France and The Critique of the Gotha Programme. Each book has a new introduction from a major contemporary thinker, to shed new light on these vital texts.

Volume 3: The First International and After: The crucial texts of Marx’s later years—notably The Civil War in France and Critique of the Gotha Programme—count among his most important work. These articles include a searching analysis of the tragic but inspiring failure of the Paris Commune, as well as essays on German unification, the Irish question, the Polish national movement and the possibility of revolution in Russia. The founding documents of the First international and polemical pieces attacking the disciples of Proudhon and Bakunin and the advocates of reformism, by contrast, reveal a tactical mastery that has influenced revolutionary movements ever since. In a new introduction the renowned Marxist David Harvey sheds light on the evolution of Marx’s notions of democracy and politics.



About the Author

Karl Marx was born in 1818, in the Rhenish city of Trier, the son of a successful lawyer. He studied law and philosophy at the universities of Bonn and Berlin, completing his doctorate in 1841. In Paris three years later, Marx was introduced to the study of political economy by a former fellow student, Frederick Engels. In 1848 they collaborated in writing "The Communist Manifesto." Expelled from Prussia in the same year, Marx took up residence first in Paris and then in London where, in 1867 he published his magnum opus "Capital." A co-founder of the International Workingmen's Association in 1864, Marx died in London in 1883.

David Harvey teaches at the Graduate Center of the City University of New York and is the author of many books, including "Social Justice and the City," "The Condition of Postmodernity," "The Limits to Capital," "A Brief History of Neoliberalism," "Spaces of Global Capitalism," and "A Companion to Marx's Capital." His website is davidharvey.org