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Live and Laugh with Dementia

The essential guide to maximizing quality of life (Empower)

Lee-Fay Low

Paperback

List Price: 14.99*
* Individual store prices may vary.

Description

Over 45 million people live with dementia worldwide. For every person with dementia, their family and caregivers face the decision of how best to care for them.

Live and Laugh with Dementia explains how to make life with dementia as positive as possible - to maximize quality of life for all concerned. Just as we need to exercise our body’s muscles to keep them strong, so too do we need to exercise our brain to strengthen and maintain our neural capabilities.

By tailoring activities to suit the needs and abilities of dementia patients, families and caregivers will help them to: 
  • Maintain their relationships with others
  • Maintain their self-identity
  • Slow the decline of mental function by providing physical and mental stimulation
  • Stave off boredom
  • Experience happiness and pleasure
     


Praise For Live and Laugh with Dementia: The essential guide to maximizing quality of life (Empower)

"... presented in a style that is informative, easy to understand, comprehensive and designed to encourage families to explore the options available to the fullest, which will encourage and allow support and enrichment for all people involved. " 
- Blue Wolf Reviews

"An amazing inspiring manual of making life with dementia as positive as possible ..... She writes with enthusiasm and insight. It's a book full of wonderful gifts of knowledge."
- Nursing Times

Empower, 9781925335729, 272pp.

Publication Date: March 6, 2018



About the Author

Lee-Fay Low is a leading researcher in the field of dementia, and is passionate about ensuring that people with dementia live good and happy lives. Currently Associate Professor in Ageing and Health at the Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Sydney, Dr Low led the first high-quality study of humour therapy for people with dementia. Her interest in dementia began close to home, as her grandmother had vascular dementia.