Feed the Baby Hummus (Paperback)

Pediatrician-Backed Secrets from Cultures Around the World

By Dr. Lisa Lewis

Familius, 9781945547799, 302pp.

Publication Date: March 1, 2018

List Price: 18.99*
* Individual store prices may vary.

Description

Parenting practices vary widely between countries and cultures. For example, in countries such as the Philippines, breastfeeding after age one year is common, and parents can make their own decision about what is right for their family. In Korea, babies eat a variety of spices and flavors, helping them develop a diverse palate and healthy eating habits.  And in Italy, parents prevent separation anxiety by taking their babies to markets, restaurants, and churches and passing them around from person to person.

Feed the Baby Hummus teaches parents to confidently incorporate various multicultural practices into their own caretaking plan. Pediatrician Lisa Lewis offers the wisdom and proven caretaking practices of the cultures of the world, drawn from her own training, research, travel, and clinical experience. Although certain standards of care must exist for babies to thrive and be happy, Feed the Baby Hummus offers a variety of cross-cultural parenting information and baby care guidance from a trusted source. 



About the Author

A practicing pediatrician for twenty years, Dr. Lisa Lewis currently serves the Fort Worth community at Kid Care Pediatrics. She has traveled the world extensively experiencing medical and parenting philosophies in various countries. In 2016 and 2017, Fort Worth Child magazine gave her a Mom-Approved Pediatrician designation based on patient votes.

In addition to her pediatric practice, Dr. Lewis contributes to various blogs and websites including Bloggy Moms and the website for New Parent Magazine. She is an active member of and contributor to Multicultural Kid Blogs, where readers from all over the world convene to share multicultural parenting information. She also reaches out to hundreds of followers via Facebook and via her website, lisalewismd.com.

Dr. Lewis is an international medical graduate, attending medical school at the American University of the Caribbean School of Medicine. During her third and fourth years of medical studies, she performed her clinical rotations at London Hospital Medical College in England, where she received clinical honors. She completed her pediatric residency at Texas A & M University Health Science Center, Scott and White Memorial Hospital, in Temple, Texas. While at Texas A & M University Health Science Center, she also served as chief resident. She then stayed on staff for two years, as assistant professor in the Department of Pediatrics. She left academia in 1998 to take care of children in a primary care setting.

Dr. Lewis is board-certified in pediatrics by the American Board of Pediatrics and a Fellow of the American Academy of Pediatrics. An active member of the Writers's League of Texas, her writing focuses on helping families enjoy cultured, healthy futures.



Praise For Feed the Baby Hummus: Pediatrician-Backed Secrets from Cultures Around the World

"An easy-to-read parenting book with a twist. Complementing the usual pediatrician guidelines for safe baby care, Lewis concludes each section with tips from global baby-care routines. Indian massage. Jamaican rosewater bath. Sumatran rocking. Jewish naming rituals. American parents will find a treasure trove of practical and time-tested suggestions here. This reader-friendly guide will make a charming baby shower gift."
Dr. Alma Gottlieb, coauthor of A World of Babies: Imagined Childcare Guides for Eight Societies 

"Dr. Lewis’s new book offers parents a truly unique guide to child-rearing. Feed the Baby Hummus not only provides traditional and time-tested parenting advice from the West, but is also interspersed with parenting stories, customs, traditions and even baby food recipes from around the world. In reading this book we realize how much there is to learn from the global parenting village. Dr. Lewis’s pediatric expertise combined with examples from around the world makes this book an insightful and comforting companion to new parents everywhere."
Leena Saini, author of Around the World in 80 Purees: Easy Recipes for Global Baby Food

"A delightful and practical read for all expecting moms and dads. I wish I read it before becoming a parent!"
Rina Mae Acosta, coauthor of The Happiest Kids in the World, How Dutch Parents Help Their Kids by Doing Less

"I have often thought that if we pooled together the most positive elements of each culture across the world we would create one strong thriving society. And what better time to do this than at the start of new life. This book provides parents with the wisdom and traditions from across the globe and ultimately the knowledge to follow their own natural intuition. A great read for new parents."
Louise Webster, founder of Beyondtheschoolrun.com and author of A New Way for Mothers
 
"Celebrate their life, hold them when they cry, feed them food that is nourishing. The baby-parent-community oneness is age-old common sense. The careful reader should find inspiration from this book and reflect on how to respectfully honor this precious time in an infant’s life while relying on practical guidance from a pediatrician who values human connectedness and culturally grounded wisdom regarding babyhood."
Patrisia Gonzales, PhD, associate professor and author of Red Medicine: Traditional Indigenous Rites of Birthing and Healing


"Though it offers a global rage of options, every part of the book affirms a parent's right to make their own choices.
 Feed the Baby Hummus
presents a wide array of good choices that parents can make during the baby's first year.

With decades of experiance as a pediatritian, Lewis knows just how challenging it can feel to make good choices in the early months of a baby's life. Her comprehensive guide offers standard practical advice from her own studies, real-life insights from families, and cross-cultural wisdom from around the world. Cultural tidbits emerge from Lewis's research and experiences and serve to bolster, add depth, and provide contrast to the book's more throrough, fairly conventional American advice about how to care for a baby.

The book is divided into sections covering stressful developmental issues like sleep and soothing, practical choices like naming and childcare, every kind of feeding question from breastfeeding to weaning, and caring for the baby's body and immune system for long-tearm health.

Cultural lessons include the open, nonjudgmental attitude of Icelandic mothers about breastfeeding; Japanese parents' hundredth-day-of-life celebrations, which introduces the baby to diverse foods; Indian parents' use of coconut oil for cradle cap; and Norwegian mothers' use of wool breast pads, among other examples. The book takes a positive view of culture, and every idea is treated with respect, highlighted for its positive impact.

Ideas from more communal, less individualistic cultures will prove the most insightful for modern Americans but may also be the most difficult to put into practice, especially for those who live far away from the baby's grandparents and extended family.

Every part of the book affirms the parents' rights to make their own choices. If offers wide-ranging ideas and practices, but more than that, it offers confidence in parental judgment. This is the refreshing in a time when so many discussions of infant parenting are fueled by extremes—never do this; you must do that.

Feed the Baby Hummus is a guide to nurturing happy, healthy babies that goes beyond conventions." 
Foreword Reviews

"This reassuring childcare volume offers a wealth of basic information, as well as useful tips and ‘secrets’ from 40 countries. Though pediatrician Lewis includes chapters on breast and bottle feeding, a recipe for Lebanese hummus, and an assortment of other recipes from a handful of countries, feeding represents just part of her focus; she also shares invaluable advice on topics ranging from sudden infant death syndrome to selecting the right kind of diaper. The well-traveled pediatrician peppers her book generously with tidbits from other cultures: in Holland, for instance, where regular routines are prized, six-month-olds generally sleep two hours more than their American counterparts; babies in Malaysia enjoy a warm-water ladle bath with soothing oil, and babies in Nigeria are not allowed to ‘cry it out’ and are consoled immediately. Lewis lavishes particular praise on the ‘baby box,’ a cardboard box packed with baby supplies that the Finnish government, since the 1930s, gives to expectant mothers (the box, once unpacked, doubles as a baby’s first bed). Throughout, Lewis’s tone is invariably evenhanded: when it comes to deciding when to stop breastfeeding (a fraught issue in various cultures), for instance, Lewis notes that no two babies, or mothers, are alike. Her book is a treasure trove of childcare tips, and a clever cross-cultural journey. (Mar.)"
Publisher's Weekly​